The 4 Critically Essential Off-The-Page Search Engine Optimization Factors

In our last lesson we talked about the things you can do on your website to help it rank well in the search engines — in other words, the “on the page” factors. In this lesson we’re going to talk about the external factors that can influence your rankings — the “off the page” factors.

Your Google PageRank

Before we get into the “hows”, it’s important that you understand a little bit about Google’s PageRank. PageRank is Google’s way of indexing all content and websites based on importance in the internet community. It’s an important factor in Google’s ranking algorithm, and by understanding a little of how it works, you’ll have a better idea about how to boost your rankings in the world’s most popular search engine.

To establish the “importance” of your page, Google looks at how many other websites are linking to your page. These links are like “votes”, and the more “votes” you have, the greater your online “importance” and the higher your PageRank.

And higher PageRank is an important contributor to higher search engine rankings.

It’s not as democratic as it sounds, however: Not every page that links to you is given equal “voting power”. Pages that have a high PageRank have more voting power than pages with low PageRank. This means that the “boost” a link gives to your own PageRank is closely related to the PageRank of the site that’s linking to you.

For instance… receiving just ONE link from a PR5 page might well give you more benefit than receiving 20 links from PR0 pages. It’s quality not quantity that’s important.

The equation for working out how much PR value you’ll get from a link looks something like this:

  • PR = 0.15 + 0.85 x (your share of the link PR)
  • By “your share of the link PR” I mean that every site only has a certain amount of PR “juice” to give out. Let’s say a page has 100 votes. Lets say it has 20 outgoing links on that page. Then each link is sending 5 votes to the other site. (100 / 20 = 5) That is a simple way of looking at the share of the PR of the link. In reality the higher-placed links get higher voting power, (e.g. 10 votes each) while the lower-placed ones will get less, (e.g. 2 votes each).

There are many other factors at play that determine the PageRank of a page:

  1. The amount of PageRank flowing in to your page. PageRank can come from other sites linking to your page, but also from other pages on your website linking to your page.
  2. Your internal linking: As I just mentioned, PageRank can also come from other pages on your website, trickling from one page to another through your internal linking, menus and such. The trick is to “sculpt” the flow of your PageRank so that it “pools” in your most important pages. (In other words, don’t waste your PageRank by linking to your “contact us” page and site-map all over the show… add rel=”nofollow” to those links to stop the PageRank leaking through to them.)
  3. The number of pages in your website: the more pages your website has, the higher your PageRank will be.
  4. The number of external sites you link to. Again, think of PageRank as being something that “flows”. By linking to lots of other websites you’re letting your PageRank flow out of your page, rather than allowing it to pool. Try to have reciprocal links wherever possible, so that the PageRank flows back to you.

The best piece of advice is to keep these points in mind when building your site and try to avoid any on-page factors which might be detrimental to the “flow” of your PageRank through your site. Once you’ve done that, work on getting quality links from quality websites. The easiest way to do this is to fill your website with useful, relevant information that makes people want to link to you!

And remember: PageRank is just part of Google’s ranking algorithm. You’ll often see pages with high PageRank being outranked by pages with lower PageRank, which shows that there’s much more at play here!

#1: Build lots of 1-way incoming links

Do this through article submissions, directory submissions, submitting articles to blog networks (such as the PLRPro blog network), buying links (e.g. from digital point forums), and so on.

But be careful…

Purchased links can sometimes be more powerful than links you get by more natural methods… but Google will penalize you if they know that you are buying links. One way they’ll nab you is if you buy a link on a monthly lease and then end up canceling it. One link might not be enough to send up the red flags, but some people buy and cancel hundreds of links in this manner.

A better idea is to buy lifetime links from places like forums.digitalpoint.com, and to try to find links from websites that are on topics relevant to your own.

#2: Get some links from good sites

By “good sites” I mean websites that have a high PageRank, or sites with a high “trust” factor (such as Yahoo, Dmoz or sites with a .edu suffix). If you can get good links to the pages on your site that generate the most income for you, even better — if you can improve the ranking of these pages you’ll get more traffic, more conversions, and more money!

#3: Make sure that pages you gain links from are, in fact, indexed.

A link to your site won’t count for anything if the page that is linking to you hasn’t actually been indexed by the search engines. The search engines won’t see the link, and they won’t give you any credit for it. I see a lot of people submitting their sites to article directories and search directories, and then ending up on a page that the search engines don’t visit. This is pointless!

The good news is that it’s pretty simple to get all these pages indexed. All you have to do is let the search engines know about the page yourself. To do this you need to set up a webpage outside of your main site, such as a free blog or a Twitter.com profile. Make sure that the search engines are indexing this page, of course, and then every time you get a new link to your main site, write about it in your blog or Twitter profile! The search engines will see this and visit the other site — hey presto! The page is now indexed, and you’ll get credit for your link.

Important: Don’t link to this blog or Twitter profile from your main money website. Doing this will create a reciprocal link loop…

#4: Don’t loop your links

Reciprocal links aren’t as powerful as one-way links. This is why you want to receive one-way links from other websites wherever possible.

But there are also things called “reciprocal link loops” which are like bigger versions of this. I mentioned one in the last tip… A links to B, B links to C and C links to A. That’s a loop… it eventually comes full circle back to the first site. A “link loop” can get pretty large, but if it eventually ends up back at the start, it’s still a loop, and all links within the loop become less powerful. Small loops are the worst, but try to avoid loops wherever possible.

That brings us to the end of our critical off-page factors for search engine optimization. In part three of this five-part mini-course I’ll talk link building strategies: Keep an eye out for it!

How Google’s Panda Update Changed SEO Best Practices Forever

It’s here! Google has released Panda update 2.2, just as Matt Cutts said they would at SMX Advanced here in Seattle a couple of weeks ago. This time around, Google has – among other things – improved their ability to detect scraper sites and banish them from the SERPs. Of course, the Panda updates are changes to Google’s algorithm and are not merely manual reviews of sites in the index, so there is room for error (causing devastation for many legitimate webmasters and SEOs).

A lot of people ask what parts of their existing SEO practice they can modify and emphasize to recover from the blow, but alas, it’s not that simple. In this week’s Whiteboard Friday, Rand discusses how the Panda updates work and, more importantly, how Panda has fundamentally changed the best practices for SEO. Have you been Panda-abused? Do you have any tips for recuperating? Let us know in the comments!

Panda, also known as Farmer, was this update that Google came out with in March of this year, of 2011, that rejiggered a bunch of search results and pushed a lot of websites down in the rankings, pushed some websites up in the rankings, and people have been concerned about it ever since. It has actually had several updates and new versions of that implementation and algorithm come out. A lot of people have all these questions like, “Ah, what’s going on around Panda?” There have been some great blog posts on SEOmoz talking about some of the technical aspects. But I want to discuss in this Whiteboard Friday some of the philosophical and theoretical aspects and how Google Panda really changes the way a lot of us need to approach SEO.

So let’s start with a little bit of Panda history. Google employs an engineer named Navneet Panda. The guy has done some awesome work. In fact, he was part of a patent application that Bill Slawski looked into where he found a great way to scale some machine learning algorithms. Now, machine learning algorithms, as you might be aware, are very computationally expensive and they take a long time to run, particularly if you have extremely large data sets, both of inputs and of outputs. If you want, you can research machine learning. It is an interesting fun tactic that computer scientists use and programmers use to find solutions to problems. But basically before Panda, machine learning scalability at Google was at level X, and after it was at the much higher level Y. So that was quite nice. Thanks to Navneet, right now they can scale up this machine learning.

What Google can do based on that is take a bunch of sites that people like more and a bunch of sites that people like less, and when I say like, what I mean is essentially what the quality raters, Google’s quality raters, tell them this site is very enjoyable. This is a good site. I’d like to see this high in the search results. Versus things where the quality raters say, “I don’t like to see this.” Google can say, “Hey, you know what? We can take the intelligence of this quality rating panel and scale it using this machine learning process.”

Here’s how it works. Basically, the idea is that the quality raters tell Googlers what they like. They answer all these questions, and you can see Amit Singhal and Matt Cutts were interviewed by Wired Magazine. They talked about some of the things that were asked of these quality raters, like, “Would you trust this site with your credit card? Would you trust the medical information that this site gives you with your children? Do you think the design of this site is good?” All sorts of questions around the site’s trustworthiness, credibility, quality, how much they would like to see it in the search results. Then they compare the difference.

The sites that people like more, they put in one group. The sites that people like less, they put in another group. Then they look at tons of metrics. All these different metrics, numbers, signals, all sorts of search signals that many SEOs suspect come from user and usage data metrics, which Google has not historically used as heavily. But they think that they use those in a machine learning process to essentially separate the wheat from the chaff. Find the ones that people like more and the ones that people like less. Downgrade the ones they like less. Upgrade the ones they like more. Bingo, you have the Panda update.

So, Panda kind of means something new and different for SEO. As SEOs, for a long time you’ve been doing the same kind of classic things. You’ve been building good content, making it accessible to search engines, doing good keyword research, putting those keywords in there, and then trying to get some links to it. But you have not, as SEOs, we never really had to think as much or as broadly about, “What is the experience of this website? Is it creating a brand that people are going to love and share and reward and trust?” Now we kind of have to think about that.

It is almost like the job of SEO has been upgraded from SEO to web strategist. Virtually everything you do on the Internet with your website can impact SEO today. That is especially true following Panda. The things that they are measuring is not, oh, these sites have better links than these sites. Some of these sites, in fact, have much better links than these sites. Some of these sites have what you and I might regard, as SEOs, as better content, more unique, robust, quality content, and yet, people, quality raters in particular, like them less or the things, the signals that predict that quality raters like those sites less are present in those types of sites.

Let’s talk about a few of the specific things that we can be doing as SEOs to help with this new sort of SEO, this broader web content/web strategy portion of SEO.

First off, design and user experience. I know, good SEOs have been preaching design user experience for years because it tends to generate more links, people contribute more content to it, it gets more social signal shares and tweets and all this other sort of good second order effect. Now, it has a first order effect impact, a primary impact. If you can make your design absolutely beautiful, versus something like this where content is buffeted by advertising and you have to click next, next, next a lot. The content isn’t all in one page. You cannot view it in that single page format. Boy, the content blocks themselves aren’t that fun to read, even if it is not advertising that’s surrounding them, even if it is just internal messaging or the graphics don’t look very good. The site design feels like it was way back in the 1990s. All that stuff will impact the ability of this page, this site to perform. And don’t forget, Google has actually said publicly that even if you have a great site, if you have a bunch of pages that are low quality on that site, they can drag down the rankings of the rest of the site. So you should try and block those for us or take them down. Wow. Crazy, right? That’s what a machine learning algorithm, like Panda, will do. It will predicatively say, “Hey, you know what? We’re seeing these features here, these elements, push this guy down.”

Content quality matters a lot. So a lot of time, in the SEO world, people will say, “Well, you have to have good, unique, useful content.” Not enough. Sorry. It’s just not enough. There are too many people making too much amazing stuff on the Internet for good and unique and grammatically correct and spelled properly and describes the topic adequately to be enough when it comes to content. If you say, “Oh, I have 50,000 pages about 50,000 different motorcycle parts and I am just going to go to Mechanical Turk or I am going to go outsource, and I want a 100 word, two paragraphs about each one of them, just describe what this part is.” You think to yourself, “Hey, I have good unique content.” No, you have content that is going to be penalized by Panda. That is exactly what Panda is designed to do. It is designed to say this is content that someone wrote for SEO purposes just to have good unique content on the page, not content that makes everyone who sees it want to share it and say wow. Right?

If I get to a page about a motorcycle part and I am like, “God, not only is this well written, it’s kind of funny. It’s humorous. It includes some anecdotes. It’s got some history of this part. It has great photos. Man, I don’t care at all about motorcycle parts, and yet, this is just a darn good page. What a great page. If I were interested, I’d be tweeting about this, I’d share it. I’d send it to my uncle who buys motorcycles. I would love this page.” That’s what you have to optimize for. It is a totally different thing than optimizing for did I use the keyword at least three times? Did I put it in the title tag? Is it included in there? Is the rest of the content relevant to the keywords? Panda changes this. Changes it quite a bit. 😉

Finally, you are going to be optimizing around user and usage metrics. Things like, when people come to your site, generally speaking compared to other sites in your niche or ranking for your keywords, do they spend a good amount of time on your site, or do they go away immediately? Do they spend a good amount of time? Are they bouncing or are they browsing? If you have a good browse rate, people are browsing 2, 3, 4 pages on average on a content site, that’s decent. That’s pretty good. If they’re browsing 1.5 pages on some sites, like maybe specific kinds of news sites, that might actually be pretty good. That might be better than average. But if they are browsing like 1.001 pages, like virtually no one clicks on a second page, that might be weird. That might hurt you. Your click-through rate from the search results. When people see your title and your snippet and your domain name, and they go, “Ew, I don’t know if I want to get myself involved in that. They’ve got like three hyphens in their domain name, and it looks totally spammy. I’m not going to get involved.” Then that click-through rate is probably going to suffer and so are your rankings.

They are going to be looking at things like the diversity and quantity of traffic that comes to your site. Do lots of people from all around the world or all around your local region, your country, visit your website directly? They can measure this through Chrome. They can measure it through Android. They can measure it through the Google toolbar. They have all this user and usage metrics. They know where people are going on the Internet, where they spend time, how much time they spend, and what they do on those pages. They know about what happens from the search results too. Do people click from a result and then go right back to the search results and perform another search? Clearly, they were unhappy with that. They can take all these metrics and put them into the machine learning algorithm and then have Panda essentially recalculate. This why you see essentially Google doesn’t issue updates every day or every week. It is about every 30 or 40 days that a new Panda update will come out because they are rejiggering all this stuff. 🙂

One of the things that people who get hit by Panda come up to me and say, “God, how are we ever going to get out of Panda? We’ve made all these changes. We haven’t gotten out yet.” I’m like, “Well, first off, you’re not going to get out of it until they rejigger the results, and then there is no way that you are going to get out of it unless you change the metrics around your site.” So if you go into your Analytics and you see that people are not spending longer on your pages, they are not enjoying them more, they are not sharing them more, they are not naturally linking to them more, your branded search traffic is not up, your direct type in traffic is not up, you see that none of these metrics are going up and yet you think you have somehow fixed the problems that Panda tries to solve for, you probably haven’t.

I know this is frustrating. I know it’s a tough issue. In fact, I think that there are sites that have been really unfairly hit. That sucks and they shouldn’t be and Google needs to work on this. But I also know that I don’t think Google is going to be making many changes. I think they are very happy with the way that Panda has gone from a search quality perspective and from a user happiness perspective. Their searchers are happier, and they are not seeing as much junk in the results. Google likes the way this is going. I think we are going to see more and more of this over time. It could even get more aggressive. I would urge you to work on this stuff, to optimize around these things, and to be ready for this new form of SEO. 🙂

Google Panda 3.1 Update : 11/18

Friday afternoon, sometime after 4pm I believe, Google tweeted that they pushed out a “minor” Panda update effecting less than one-percent of all searches.

The last time Google said a Panda update was minor, it turned out to be pretty significant.

That being said, we should have named it 3.0 – in fact, I spoke to someone at Google who felt the same. So I am going to name this one 3.1, although it does make it easier to reference these updates by dates.

Panda Updates:

 

For more on Panda, see our Google Panda category.

Forum discussion at WebmasterWorld.

Best SEO Blogs: Top 10 Sources to Stay Up-to-Date

Like many overly-connected web junkies, I find myself increasingly overwhelmed by information, resources and news. Sorting the signal from the noise is essential to staying sane, but missing an important development can be costly. To balance this conflict, I’ve recently re-arranged my daily reading habits (which I’ve written about several times before) and my Firefox sidebar (a critical feature that keeps me from switching to Chrome).

I’ll start by sharing my top 10 sources in the field of search & SEO, then give you a full link list for those interested in seeing all the resources I use. I’ve whittled the list down to just ten to help maximize value while minimizing time expended (in my less busy days, I’d read 4-5 dozen blogs daily and even more than that each week).

Top 10 Search / SEO Blogs

#1 – Search Engine Land

Best SEO Blogs - SearchEngineLand

  • Why I Read It: For several years now, SELand has been the fastest, most accurate and well-written news source in the world of search. The news pieces in particular provide deep, useful, interesting coverage of their subjects, and though some of the columns on tactics/strategies are not as high quality, a few are still worth a read. Overall, SELand is the best place to keep up with the overall search/technology industry, and that’s important to anyone operating a business in the field.
  • Focus: Search industry and search engine news
  • Update Frequency: Multiple times daily

#2 – SEOmoz

SEOmoz Blog

  • Why I Read It: Obviously, it’s hard not to be biased, but removing the personal interest, the SEOmoz Blog is still my favorite source for tactical & strategic advice, as well as “how-to” content. I’m personally responsible for 1 out of every 4-6 articles, but the other 75%+ almost always give me insight into something new. The comments are also, IMO, often as good or better than the posts – the moz community attracts a lot of talented, open, sharing professionals and that keeps me reading daily.
  • Focus: SEO & web marketing tactics & strategies
  • Update Frequency: 1-2 posts per weekday

#3 – SEOBook

SEOBook Blog

  • Why I Read It: The SEOBook blog occassionally offers some highly useful advice or new tactics, but recently, most of the commentary focuses on the shifting trends in the SEO industry, along with a healthy dose of engine and establishment-critical editorials. These are often quite instructive on their own, and I think more than a few have had substantive impact on changing the direction of players big and small.
  • Focus: Inudstry trends as they relate to SEO; Editorials on abuse & manipulation
  • Update Frequency: 1-3X per week

#4 – Search Engine Roundtable

SERoundtable Blog

  • Why I Read It: Barry Schwartz has long maintained this bastion of recaps, roundups and highlights from search-related discussions and forums across the web. The topics are varied, but usually useful and interesting enough to warrant at least a daily browse or two.
  • Focus: Roundup of forum topics, industry news, SEO discussions
  • Update Frequency: 3-4X Daily

#5 – Search Engine Journal

SEJournal Blog

  • Why I Read It: The Journal strikes a nice balance between tactical/strategic articles and industry coverage, and anything SELand misses is often here quite quickly. They also do some nice roundups of tools and resources, which I find useful from an analysis & competitive research perspective.
  • Focus: Indsutry News, Tactics, Tools & Resources
  • Update Frequency: 2-3X Daily

#6 – Conversation Marketing

Conversation Marketing

  • Why I Read It: I think Ian Lurie might be the fastest rising on my list. His blog has gone from ocassionally interesting to nearly indispensable over the last 18 months, as the quality of content, focus on smart web/SEO strategies and witty humor shine through. As far as advice/strategy blogs go in the web marketing field, his is one of my favorites for consistently great quality.
  • Focus: Strategic advice, how-to articles and the occassional humorous rant
  • Update Frequency: 2-4X weekly

#7 – SEO By the Sea

SEO by the Sea

  • Why I Read It: Bill Slawski takes a unique approach to the SEO field, covering patent applications, IR papers, algorithmic search technology and other technically interesting and often useful topics. There’s probably no better analysis source out there for this niche, and Bill’s work will often inspire posts here on SEOmoz (e.g. 17 Ways Search Engines Judge the Value of a Link).
  • Focus: IR papers, patents and search technology
  • Update Frequency: 1-3X per week

#8 – Blogstorm

Blogstorm

  • Why I Read It: Although Blogstorm doesn’t update as frequently as some of the others, neraly every post is excellent. In the last 6 months, I’ve been seriously impressed by the uniqueness of the material covered and the insight shown by the writers (mostly Patrick Altoft with occassional other contributors). One of my favorites, for example, was their update to some of the AOL CTR data, which I didn’t see well covered elsewhere.
  • Focus: SEO insider analysis, strategies and research coverage
  • Update Frequency: 3-5X monthly

#9 – Dave Naylor

David Naylor

  • Why I Read It: Dave’s depth of knowledge is legendary and unlike many successful business owners in the field, he’s personally kept himself deeply aware of and involved in SEO campaigns. This acute attention to the goings-on of the search rankings have made his articles priceless (even if the grammar/spelling isn’t always stellar). The staff, who write 50%+ of the content these days, are also impressively knowledgable and maintain a good level of discourse and disclosure.
  • Focus: Organic search rankings analysis and macro-industry trends
  • Update Frequency: 1-3X weekly

#10 – Marketing Pilgrim

Marketing Pilgrim

  • Why I Read It: A good mix of writers cover the search industry news and some tactical/strategic subjects as well. The writing style is compelling and it’s great to get an alternative perspective. I’ve also noticed that MP will sometimes find a news item that other sites miss and I really appreciate the feeling of comprehensiveness that comes from following them + SELand & SERoundtable.
  • Focus: Industry news, tactical advice and a bit of reputation/social management
  • Update Frequency: 2-3X daily

Other sites that I’ll read regularly (who only barely missed my top 10) include DistilledYOUmoz,PerformableChris Brogan, the Webmaster Central BlogEric EngeAvinash KaushikSEWatchGil Reich& the eMarketer blog. I also highly recommend skimming through SEO Alltop, as it lets me quickly review anything from the longer tail of SEO sites.


The rest of my Firefox sidebar is listed below, sorted into sections according to the folders I use. Note that because I’ve got the SEOmoz toolbar (mozBar), I use that to access all the moz SEO tools rather than replicating them in my sidebar. I’ve also been able to ditch my large collection of bookmarklets thanks to the mozBar, but if you prefer to keep them, here’s a great set of 30 SEO Bookmarklets (all draggable).

UPDATE: TopRank just published a list of the most subscribed-to blogs in the SEO field that can also be a great resource for those interested. 🙂

source: http://www.seomoz.org

How to Establish QUALITY Backlinks?

When starting your own website or blog, acquiring a good search engine ranking position (SERP) is usually one of the main goals. Achieving a high SERP for relevant keywords is essential for the exposure you need to drive traffic and visitors to your content. When you see the number of online competitors, it is enough to overwhelm even the most determined webmaster. However, if you plan things out properly, you can overcome even stiff competition with a bit of effort. You can even do this with fewer posts and a much younger site.

The way to reach the top spots in searches is through properly targeted quality content and backlinks. You correctly target your posts and backlinks based on your niche’s relevant keywords. Relevant keywords is a short way of saying the words and phrases that people will naturally type into search engines when they are looking for the kind of content, products, and/or services that you offer.

Quality content is an important key. Your posts, articles, videos, and other content must appeal to human readers. It is easy to adjust well-written features to include relevant keywords for the search engines to see. However, you will only drive away human readers if you make poorly written blogs, spammy sales text, and other “junk” content. It is important to make sure things are tuned properly for search engines, but do not forget it is human beings that open their minds and wallets.

Building good backlinks to quality content is one of the most effective and surefire ways to drive your site to the top of the SERPs. Good backlinks use your relevant keywords as the anchor text. Anchor text is simply a web link that is wrapped around a word or set of words, just link a website menu link. 🙂

Knowing where to build your backlinks is a key element. You should place your links naturally in places that have many visitors and/or high search engine trust. Trust is usually measured by PageRank, which is a measure of website authority by Google. Alexa Rank is the normal tool to measure visitor volume.

Blog backlinks are one of the most common and powerful tools. Bloggers form a large network and community. You can include your website and one or two backlinks with a blog comment. Auto-approve blogs are considered highly desirable, because comments are not screened and do not wait on a human being to approve them. Dofollow relevant blogs and forums are also greatly sought after because backlinks from them count the most, as the search engines see the referring site as explicitly endorsing the links.

When leaving blog backlinks, be sure to include substantive comments. Just spamming your links everywhere will have you targeted by spam detection programs and leave a wake of annoyed blog owners. When using auto approve blogs, be sure to check the other links present. You do not want your site featured in a “bad neighborhood” with male enhancement and gambling spammers. Auto-approve blogs make for easy and good links, if the comments are not overfull and the other links look good.

It can seem impossible when first starting out to reach the top of the search engine rankings. However, you can dominate the search results with quality content and good backlinks. Blog backlinks are among the most popular options and auto-approve blogs provide a major venue to promote your site.

Cheers !!! 🙂

Easy Ways To Optimize Your Site For SEO- Quick Overview

Are you losing your mind and pulling your hair out trying to crack the code of search engine optimization? Look, I have been there so let me enlighten you on a few easy techniques I have picked up along the way to help you get more traffic and make more sales through your websites and web 2.0 properties.

Fist off there is no magic formula to SEO no matter what guru says so nor is it a complicated process expressed by so-called SEO experts. Basically it comes down to common sense on how things work on the technical side of things online.

First off is keywords. If you are driving traffic to your websites via keywords you ought to know how to utilize them to the max for best case scenario. Using the keyword in your domain, description, title, and tags is very important but do not over use them in the body of text. One time in bold is enough and have your main keyword supported by other keywords in your text but most importantly write naturally using slang and proper language associated with your topic. There are SEO tools to help point this out if you are using a blogging platform in case your eyes miss it. 🙂

Next is competition. can you compete against a giant keyword term? You could but it will take a very long time to catch up, so best stick with things you can compete with. Usually staying under 100,000 competing pages is key to ranking on the first page. Look at your competition and take note of their domain age, page rank, and backlinks. This will determine what it will take and how long it will take to out rank them.

And then there is backlinks. This is a very important step to insuring you rank in the top 10 or even #1! It is not how many backlinks you have but where they are coming from. An example: 25 links from PR5 to PR9 sites will outrank 10,000 links from junk low page rank sites, period. I should also point out that these links should be relevant to your niche. If you have a site on “SEO” then most of your links coming in should be from SEO type sites and not “basket weaving” for instance. This way you can easily become untouchable in the rankings.

Good luck!!! 🙂

How to Get Better Search Engine Placement – 5 Easy Ways to Improve Search Engine Ranking

Are you trying to figure out how to get better search engine placement? I certainly don’t blame you. After all, did you know that the top three listings on Google’s first page of results capture about 98% of the traffic? And of course, the site sitting in position #1 is grabbing most of that 98% percent. Ohhh, I do love being in the first position.

I’m guessing that’s where you want to be too. Well, here are some things you need to know to help learn how to get better search engine placement.

On page optimization – on page optimization consists of displaying certain data and information on your website in a certain way. By doing this you’ve told Google and the other search engines what your site is about rather than having them guess or make some “analytic” assumptions regarding what it’s about.

There are some specific things that should be done to accomplish this goal. And many of these actions have been confirmed by Google as directly affecting how it looks at and reads a site. The following list covers some of those items that will help get better search engine placement.

Domain name – Choose a domain name for your site that includes your keyword. An exact match of your keyword is typically best although variations haven been proven to be effective as well.

Title tags – Include your keyword in your title tag. What better way to tell the search engines what your site is about than include the keyword in the title of site? In fact, you should use as many keywords in your title as possible while still having the title make sense to the search engines and your readers

Meta description – Apply the same theory regarding your keywords to your meta description as you did the title tag. The obvious difference is that title of your site is essentially a one-line statement where the description tells what your site is about. Again, the description should include as many keywords as possible while still making sense to the search engines and the readers.

Alt image tags – These tags are basically the text associated with the image. The search engine spiders can’t read what an image is about. However, they can read the text in an alt image tag. In doing that they can tell what the site is about. This is why you want to use your keyword in your alt image tag.

Anchor links – Anchor links are very similar to alt image tags in that you can use them to tie your keyword to the link to your website. Google, Yahoo, Bing, and the other engines see the correlation and connect the keyword to the link.

Understanding off page optimization is also another critical topic in learning how to get better search engine placement. Off page optimization for the purpose of this article are the things you do outside of your webpage that help to raise your placement in the search engines. Most of the off page optimization involves the creation of backlinks.

For a simple explanation, backlinks are simply having other websites or pages carry a link to your site within their site or on one of their webpages. Backlinks can be achieved through a variety of techniques. Some examples of those techniques are:

1. social bookmarking

2. blog comments

3. classified ads

4. web directories

5. article directories

6. and more…

It’s important to note that all backlinks are not created equal. To get the most bang for your backlink buck, try to get your links on sites that have high PR rank, are related to the topic of your site, and carry a “do follow” attribute.

Applying these techniques will help improve your search engine rankings. And these methods are definitely the best advice for how to get better search engine placement.

How to Get Quality Backlinks, Some Must Know Best Tips!

Do you know how to get backlinks? I am sure you know how to get some backlinks, but it is important to know different methods of getting backlinks. Search engines, including Google, look at a few key components when determining page rank for websites. One of those components is how many backlinks a site has, and the quality of those backlinks. The more backlinks and the higher the quality the better your site will rank. This article is going to discuss different methods on how to get backlinks.

I am writing this article for two purposes. One is to help you possibly learn a couple of new ways to get backlinks and the other is to give myself a quality backlink. Yes, that is right, writing articles can give you backlinks. Even better if you publish your article in an article directory such as EzineArticles, you are going to get a good quality backlink. To get backlinks with articles you write an informative article about your niche or website. Then include a link or two to your site in the resource box. Article writing can be beneficial in two ways, you are sharing useful information and getting backlinks to help your website get a good page ranking.

A relatively easy way that you can build backlinks is to search for blogs or other articles that are related to your website. Read the blog post or the article and see if you can add an insightful comment. When you leave the comment you will include a link to your website. Just be sure that you are actually leaving quality comments. Do not spam the author of the material you are commenting on. Just as I am sure you would rather not have people spam your site, please do not spam others.

The last tip I have for you today, is to include your website address in forums that you participate in. You can simply place your website in your signature line, and then every time leave you leave a post your site will be there. Do not just start joining random forums and leaving spam. The search engines are smart and they will pick up on that. Just make sure to have a signature line in forums that you do visit.

Building backlinks is a very important part of SEO. It is one step that many people overlook because it can be time consuming and tedious. I have just shared with you a few methods on how to get backlinks to your site. If you really want to increase page rank for your site I suggest working on building backlinks slowly. Do not bombard your site with a whole bunch at once. A slow drip of backlnks will be more natural and it will help your site to move up in the ranks and stay there.